Tag Archive | growing old ain’t easy

Dear Dad…

Dear Dad,

It’s been almost 11 years, and I don’t know that I’ve ever missed you more than I do right now. I’m writing this in a chair beside Mom’s hospital bed. She’s been in the hospital for four days, as I suppose you know, and she doesn’t seem to be improving yet. In fact, there’s been a new complication every day. I sure wish I could ask you what to do.

She’s having trouble eating. She ate pretty well on Saturday (after two days of keeping down nothing but liquids), but on Sunday she had no appetite at all and had to make an effort to take a few bites. A couple of times she muttered wearily, “Gotta eat to stay alive.” It reminded me of the last year or so of your life, when you had to take in all liquids through a feeding tube because otherwise you aspirated into your lungs, and how you used to talk about all the hours you spent in a day “just staying alive.” I remember when you asked me to find that Bee Gees song, and I decided to make you a whole CD of music I thought you’d like, including “Stayin’ Alive”… but I didn’t finish it in time. Sorry about that, Pops.

Anyway, back to Mom. She ate almost nothing yesterday, and when I was there at dinner I discovered that the issue was more than having no appetite or feeling too tired to make the effort. She couldn’t seem to remember HOW to eat. She let me spoon feed her a little bit of pudding and I think that was all she ate all day except for a Boost shake at lunch. This morning I fed her breakfast and she actually seemed interested in the food for the first time, telling me “Now the applesauce” or “Give me a bite of that yogurt.” But when she tried to feed herself, she was missing her mouth and dribbling food down her chin. What does this mean, Dad? Is it going to get better, or is this where we are now?

I wish you could tell me what it means that Mom is “dreaming with [her] eyes open” and talking to people who aren’t here. A couple of times she’s seen someone in the room. I don’t know if it’s just the multiple infections, or a side effect of one of the many medications, or if she’s starting to see between the worlds. She hasn’t mentioned seeing anyone who I know to be on your side of the veil yet, which is a comfort to me. I’m not quite ready to let her go. You’ll have to wait a little longer for your dance partner, OK?

* * * *

LATER: I put this aside to help Mom, and then they brought her dinner tray. I started feeding her some mashed potatoes and gravy, and after a couple of bites she said, “Let me feed myself!” She moved slowly and a little clumsily, but she didn’t miss her mouth this time. She ate some mashed potato, a couple bites of the fish (too tough), some applesauce and some pudding. And when she’d eaten all she could, she actually picked up the word search puzzle book I brought her for the first time. She didn’t do more than flip through the pages and put it down again, but it’s an improvement. I feel much more hopeful than I did a few hours ago. If you had anything to do with that, Dad, thank you.

One more thing, Dad… I wish I could have seen your reaction to the smug know-it-all hospitalist, though I’m pretty sure I know what it would have been. His behavior was just like the surgeons you used to complain about at the dinner table back when you were an anesthesiologist. I wanted you here to put him in his place when he was so condescending and dismissive to the nurse who had been so wonderful with Mom. No wonder the nurses at Franciscan appreciated you so much.

I have to get some sleep now. Thanks for keeping an eye on Mom. I love you.

Dad Sleeping

Advertisements

Bad Days & Batty Ideas

The last couple of days haven’t been good days for Mom. Yesterday when I arrived mid-afternoon, as arranged, to take her to get her hair done, she was just starting to eat her lunch. The staff explained that she was having so much pain in her knee that she’d refused to get up from her recliner to eat or even go to the bathroom. I knew she wasn’t going to be up to the hair salon, so I just sat with her while she ate her lunch. Before I left, I leaned down behind her wheelchair and hugged her. She gripped my arms tightly and said softly, “That feels good. Comforting… Reassuring.” I kissed her forehead and told her that I love her and I’d see her tomorrow.

We did make it to the hair salon today, but it was a struggle all the way. Her legs were so weak, it took both caregivers lifting under her arms to transfer her from wheelchair to car. When we got to the salon, she and I struggled to get her out of the car. Usually she can push up with her arms and get to standing, but today she needed to be lifted. Once she had collapsed into the wheelchair, she looked up at me and said, “I’m a mess.” I shrugged that off with a smile, but I hate to hear her talk like that. It’s a strong indicator that she’s not feeling like herself.  The hairstylist helped me get her from wheelchair to shampoo chair; and to save Mom the extra strain on her legs, she let her stay in the wheelchair while she cut her hair and rolled it up on the rollers. Mom was practically nodding off in the chair, and by the time we got back to the car, she wasn’t sure if she could get up again. She was almost a dead weight, and when I managed to haul her to her feet, she just leaned her head against my chest and seemed to be having trouble turning around. She barely got her butt onto the edge of the car seat, but we made it.

I’m worried about her today, wondering if it’s the neurological issues progressing that is causing these mobility issues or if there’s a systemic issue making her so weak. Or both. Sigh. I’m hoping she’ll be up for going to church on Easter Sunday, which was the whole reason I put her through the trip to the salon.

Yesterday while Mom was in the bathroom, I was talking to Jenny, one of the other residents who also has dementia. “Do you know who came up with this batty idea?” she asked me, out of the blue. What batty idea is that, Jenny? “To cut off our arms and legs!” she replied, indignant. Yes, I agreed, that does sound like a batty idea. I wondered where it had come from, but then she continued… “I try to use my arms to push myself up, but they don’t want me to do that. They don’t want us to use our arms and legs. Your mother, too. Our arms and legs work just fine!” Well, I commented, my mom’s legs aren’t working too well right now…

I’ve been thinking about this today, wondering if the staff really are “cutting off [the use of] their arms and legs” by insisting on lifting the residents instead of letting them push themselves up and just giving them a boost as needed.  I know they’re trying to ensure  safety and avoid falls, but it’s so discouraging to see my mom losing the use of her legs. And her arms have always been strong, even when she had PT in the hospital. Use it or lose it, as they say. But I don’t know what to do about that.

 

Stalled

Mom’s recovery progress seems to have stalled. Friday when the physical therapist was working with her, in the half hour or so he had her off oxygen, her sats dropped from 93 to 83. I called Dr. G’s office about that and he ordered a chest x-ray. Until we get the results we’re to keep her on oxygen 24/7.

Yesterday I was able to take her to church for the first time in 6 weeks. She was happy to be there and particularly enjoyed the attention from her friends in the seniors Sunday school class, but she had some trouble transferring from the wheelchair to the pew and (especially) back again. When I got her home after the service, she was ready for a nap!  I noticed when I picked her up for church that her left hand  and wrist were very swollen and puffy. It had improved a little by the time we were driving home, so I decided it wasn’t worth spending our Sunday afternoon at Urgent Care when I’d be seeing her again today.

She seemed tired today, much less perky than she was for church yesterday. When we pulled in to the parking lot for the Imaging Center, I checked her O2 level and it was only 89 — even though she’d been continually on oxygen. Feeling thankful that we were getting the x-ray done, I finagled the wheelchair and the portable oxygen tank inside and even managed to fit both of us and the equipment in the small dressing room, so I could help her get undressed and into a gown. When the x-ray techs told me she was going to have to stand while they took the images, I explained that her legs are weak and her balance is very poor — so they gave me a heavy lead smock and let me stand beside her, my hand on the small of her back to keep her steady. Mom clung to the sides of the board as if to a life raft in deep water, but she managed to stay standing with her back straight and followed their breathing instructions while they took the images. Her PT would have been proud.

The swelling in her left hand and forearm was about the same as when I left her yesterday, and I noticed her feet are now swollen also. While we were waiting our turn, I called the cardiologist’s office about that. Her doctor is off today, so the receptionist gave the message to a nurse who consulted with one of the other cardiologists and called me back. They said it “doesn’t sound like a heart issue” and recommended she increase her Lasix dosage for the next 48 hours and call back if the situation hasn’t improved by then.

While I’m relieved they don’t seem concerned about it, I’d sure like to know what’s going on. Between this and the difficulty keeping her satured with oxygen, it’s obvious that something isn’t right. For now, we wait.