Breaks My Heart Every Time

There’s a new resident at my mom’s care home. I’ll call her Jenny. The first couple of times I met her, she seemed so together – introduced herself, remembered on my next visit that I was Dorothy’s daughter and she’d met me before, asking my mom how it went at the doctor when we returned from an appointment – that I almost wondered why she needs to be in board and care. She walks with a walker, but (like my mom) seems to get around really well with it. I was happy that my mom would have someone at the house to chat with besides the caregivers, who are really kind and engaged but too busy to just sit and visit with her.

Then one time when I brought Mom home from an appointment, Jenny said to me “I know you! You live next door to Bert, don’t you?” I shook my head. No, sorry, you’re thinking of someone else. “But I know I’ve seen you there,” she insisted. “I know you!” I told her again, you’re thinking of someone else. I don’t know Bert. Mom spoke up then, saying, “This is my daughter. You’ve met her before.”

Jenny may get confused about who I am, but she always seems happy to see me when I come in. Whoever she thinks I am, I’m glad that person is someone she likes.

This afternoon when I brought Mom home from church, Jenny met us just inside the door. “Will you do me a favor?” she asked me. I was busy helping Mom, who had taken off her sunglasses and was asking for her regular glasses from her purse, so I didn’t respond. Jenny was saying something about someone she hadn’t seen in a long time. Maria, the head caregiver, held up a pill bottle and started talking to me about one of Mom’s medications that needs to be reordered.

Jenny was still talking to me, looking intently at me from a few yards away, but I hadn’t heard a word she’d said. She started to cry, loudly, like a small child. I looked helplessly from one caregiver to the other, hoping one of them would do something, but they were paying Jenny no mind. “I’m sorry to be a crybaby,” she was saying, sniffling. I felt horrible.

I kissed my mom goodbye, told Maria that I would request a refill of that medication, and headed for the door. Jenny was between me and the door. She stopped sniffling and looked at me with hopeful eyes. “Will you drive me to the party?” she asked me. “It’s not far from here, just over on Van Nuys.”

I put my hand on her shoulder and said, as gently as I could, “I’m so sorry that I can’t.”

Jenny began to cry again, almost wailing, “But I haven’t seen them for so long!” I patted her shoulder helplessly and then moved toward the door.

As the door was closing behind me, I was relieved to hear Maria saying “What’s the matter, Jenny?”

If my mom was crying like that, it would break my heart. But she’s my mom and maybe there would be something I could do to make it better. I never know how to respond when it’s another resident. And it breaks my heart just the same.

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One thought on “Breaks My Heart Every Time

  1. Oh how terrible for both you and Jenny! I have a hard time not responding with the truth too. She was obviously wrong about a party. So maybe next time play along like the party is next week…. I’m always afraid that if I play along that will be the one thing they remember! It’s so hard sometimes! Hugs!

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